Tips for Good Grades

You don’t have to show up 15 minutes early to class everyday to be a good student. You don’t need to sit in the front row to let your teachers know you are paying attention. And you definitely don’t have to bust out color coded notes to make good grades.

But if you want to be sure you actually pass your classes this semester, there are a few tips you can follow to signal to your professors that you deserve a decent grade.

Don’t consistently walk in late. 

If your class starts at 2:50 p.m., your teacher is probably going to start teaching at 2:50 p.m. Most professors are aware that things will come up sometimes and make it difficult for you to get to class and have even implemented policies giving you a 15-minute leniency period. But if you are constantly late to class, the teacher will start to recognize your face (and not in a good way).

Raise your hand. 

Yes. Actually communicate with your professor. When he or she asks a question, try your best to answer it sometimes or comment on the statement. Interjecting your voice into conversation will help him or her recognize you in a good way.

Ask your own questions. 

You’re not going to know the answer to everything or necessarily always have a comment. But letting your professor know you have no idea what’s going on by asking productive questions will help you learn the answers and let them know you are trying. 

Take your question into office hours. 

We have all sat in the library at 3:00 a.m. cramming the night before an exam wishing we had asked the professor more about the topic rather than staring at Facebook the entire class period. Don’t let it come to this, and take your questions to your professor’s office hours.

Communicate your problems. 

Professors will have more respect for you if you let them know when you have a problem with an assignment or the way they are teaching something. Complaining about it to other students and professors doesn’t help you or the professor you have a problem with. Be an adult and let them know you are having issues processing a certain situation. Based on experience, they are usually more than happy to work things out with you.

Learn about them. 

Remember that 10-minute bio every single one of your professors gives you on the first day of class? No. You probably don’t. So, asking your teachers more questions about themselves and how they got into the profession can really get your on their good side.

Put your phone away.

This is the most important point on this list. Many professors will ask you to put your phone away, while others won’t ever mention it. But that doesn’t mean they don’t see you scrolling through Instagram. When it comes time to access that 20 percent participation grade they will remember. 


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