The Daily Gamecock

Amelia Farrell


Sandy Smith (center) stands beside her daughter Stephanie Smith (left) and Susanne Andrews (right), a organizer of the #StandingforStephen event. The event was a fundraiser held at the Capital Club for the family of Stephen Smith, an openly gay 19-year-old who was killed in what was declared an unsolved hit and run in 2015. Stephen’s case was reopened earlier this year “based upon information gathered during the course of the double murder investigation of Paul and Maggie Murdaugh,” according to a statement by SLED.

Fundraiser remembers hit-and-run victim connected to Murdaugh investigations, brings awareness to anti-LGBTQIA+ violence

The Capital Club, a gay bar in Columbia, hosted the #StandingforStephenSmith event on Oct. 30. The event was held to honor and raise money for the family of Stephen Smith, a gay teen who was killed in an unsolved hit-and-run in Hampton County, South Carolina, in 2015. Smith's case has been reopened in connection with the Murdaugh family murder investigations.

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USC students display and sell their crafted goods at Soda City, a popular market for local artisans, farmers and food vendors, thanks to the help of Student Made of USC. Student Made is a business that connects campus artists with one another and offers opportunities for small business creators to grow their brand. 

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USC students display and sell their crafted goods at Soda City, a popular market for local artisans, farmers and food vendors, thanks to the help of Student Made of USC. Student Made is a business that connects campus artists with one another and offers opportunities for small business creators to grow their brand. 

A picture of a portable HVAC unit in the Humanities Classroom Building. The failing air conditioning system will be replaced but is a current threat to the electrical systems, has caused discomfort for students, faculty and staff and could promote the spread of COVID-19.

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A picture of a portable HVAC unit in the Humanities Classroom Building. The failing air conditioning system will be replaced but is a current threat to the electrical systems, has caused discomfort for students, faculty and staff and could promote the spread of COVID-19.

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